Political

Girl with Puppy Dog Eyes

After Photoshop: Manipulated Photography in the Digital Age

Over the past twenty years, photography has undergone a dramatic transformation. Mechanical cameras and silver-based film have been replaced by electronic image sensors and microchips…

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The Pergamon Project

Alfredo Jaar: The way it is. An Aesthetics of Resistance

The Neue Gesellschaft für Bildende Kunst (New Society for Visual Arts) presents an exhibition by Chilean artist Alfredo Jaar simultaneously at three Berlin institutions. The monographic show offers a retrospective survey of an artistic production spanning close to four decades.

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Jean Luc Godard 2 or 3 things

2 or 3 Things I Know About Her By Jean-Luc Godard

2 or 3 Things I Know About Her is perhaps Godard’s most revelatory look at consumer culture, shot in ravishing widescreen color by Raoul Coutard

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Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms

Gabriel Orozco’s Asterisms – Deutsche Guggenheim Museum

The Deutsche Guggenheim presents Asterisms, a two-part sculptural and photographic installation by the Mexican-born artist Gabriel Orozco and the eighteenth project in Deutsche Guggenheim’s series of commissions

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Jean Luc Godard made in USA

Made in USA by Jean-Luc Godard

Jean-Luc Godard directed this brightly colored, pop-art homage to American crime cinema, which somehow finds room for extended commentary on leftist politics and the corrupt nature of advertising.

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No lone zone Tate modern

Tate Modern: No Lone Zone

‘No Lone Zone’ is a military term designating an area where, for reasons of safety and security, the presence of just one person is not allowed. The phrase can also be used metaphorically to describe a highly sensitive or unstable place, such as the vulnerable environments that proliferate in the context of postcolonial globalisation.

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Lynn Hershman Leeson

!Women Art Revolution

Women Art Revolution annotates the evolution of the Feminist Art Movement in the United States from the personal perspective of feminist artist and film director Lynn Hershman Leeson.

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Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451 by François Truffaut

François Truffaut’s Fahrenheit 451 brings Ray Bradbury’s big-brother world into crisp focus, employing a thought-provoking production design full of muted technicolor and almost entirely devoid of written language — even the opening credits are spoken. The

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Pierrot le Fou

Pierrot Le Fou by Jean-Luc Godard

Godard’s Pierrot Le Fou is blissful with color imagery by cinematographer Raoul Coutard. It is one of the high points of the French New Wave, and was Godard’s last frolic before he moved ever further into radical cinema.

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Yinka_Shonibare_fake_death

Yinka Shonibare: Addio del Passato

British-born Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare, explores the concept of destiny as it relates to themes of desire, yearning, love, power and sexual repression. In this exhibition Shonibare continues his explorations of Lord Nelson, the figurehead of the British Empire at its apotheosis.

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Tout Va Bien by Jean-Luc Godard

France  |  1972  |  96 minutes  |  Color
www.criterion.com

SYNOPSIS: In 1972, newly radicalized Hollywood star Jane Fonda joined forces with cinematic innovator Jean-Luc Godard and collaborator Jean-Pierre Gorin in an unholy artistic alliance that resulted in Tout va bien (Everything’s All Right). This free-ranging assault on consumer capitalism and the establishment left tells the story of a wildcat strike at a sausage factory as witnessed by an American reporter (Fonda) and her has-been New Wave film director husband (Yves Montand). Tout Va Bien is a masterpiece of radical cinema, a caustic critique of society, marriage, and revolution in post-1968 France.

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